• Association for Children's Mental Health (ACMH): The ACMH was founded in 1989 by two parents of children with emotional disorders to support families who were shamed and blamed for their children’s problems. ACMH is a family organization with statewide staff and membership who support activities to enhance the system of services which address the needs of children with serious emotional disorders and their families.
  • Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (WebMD): ADHD can affect families by straining sibling relationships; causing a child to underachieve in school; diminishing family cohesiveness; and creating marital stress. This pamphlet answers the questions, How do I know when to seek help? How do I distinguish between normal and problem behaviors? How do I know that the diagnosis for my child is correct? Does my child have to be treated with medication?
  • Children's Mental Health Fact Sheets: This page contains a number of important facts about children, youth and mental health..
  • Children & Divorce: As a parent, it’s normal to feel uncertain about how to give your children the right support through your divorce or separation. It may be uncharted territory, but you can successfully navigate this unsettling time—and help your kids emerge from it feeling loved, confident, and strong. This page explains how.
  • Children's Attachment Relationships: Attachment is the deep connection established between a child and caregiver that profoundly affects your child's development and ability to express emotions and develop relationships. Discover more about this on this page.
  • Federation of Families for Children's Mental Health - Colorado Chapter: Promoting the mental health of all children, youth and families, this site contains a number of useful and interesting resources on children and youth mental health.
  • Glossary of Children's Mental Health Terms: A list or common and not-so-common terms used to refer to a child's mental health along with their definitions.
  • MedlinePlus: This link contains a great deal of information on childhood issues including symptomology, treatment and even some research on these issues.
  • Mental Health America (MHA), Children's Mental Health Resource List: This site includes a great deal of links to a good number of childhood issues including ADHD, Autism, and Back to School tips for parents.
  • Mental Illness in Children (AAMFT): Although mental illness (MI) usually does not occur until late adolescence or adulthood, it can and does occur in childhood. When MI occurs in childhood, it is considered childhood-onset mental illness (COMI). COMI can cause serious problems for the children and adolescents who have it, including problems in their biological, social, and emotional development. If untreated, children with COMI can live their lives misunderstood and mistreated.
  • Nana's Children Mental Health Foundation: Nana's Children Mental Health Foundation, Inc. is dedicated to providing life-changing mental health support for homeless and impoverished children through a model which utilizes the child's most accurate form of communication: PLAY!
  • National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP): Children's Mental Health: This site contains useful information on the effects of poverty upon a child's mental well-being.
  • NIMH (National Institute of Mental Health) This link contains description of childhood and adolescent psychopathologies as well as links on treatment and issues of trauma.
  • The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA): Children Mental Health Facts: This site covers such issues as anxiety disorders, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Learning Disorders, Conduct Disorder, etc. for both children and adolescents. Admittedly biased towards the AMA (American Medical Association) model of disorders, it is nonetheless a full of good information and worth checking out.
 
  • Adolescent Youth Mental Health Fact
    Sheet (11-15 years old)
    : Put out by a group in Kentucky, this fact sheet contains and interesting comparison of more normal and abnormal adolescent and youth behavior.
  • Adolescent Behavior Problems (AAMFT): Many factors put youth and families at risk for juvenile delinquency. Research indicates that the most effective treatments, even with very difficult youth, are programs and treatments that are family-based and multisystemic. Treatments that focus on the family can also be useful in helping adults develop their parenting skills, deal with stress, and work on marital relationships.
  • Adolescent Self-Harm (AAMFT): By definition, self-harm refers to hurting oneself to relieve emotional pain or distress. Many adolescents today are engaging in this dangerous behavior, often in secrecy. The good news is that there are treatments to help teens and families with this issue.
  • Adolescent Substance Abuse (AAMFT): By the time they are high school seniors, most teens have tried an illicit drug. Such experimentation has the potential to develop into severe drug use and dependence. This pamphlet offers a snapshot of the various factors surrounding adolescent substance abuse, and provides parents and guardians with sound advice and useful resources to learn more about avoiding and treating this problem.
  • Assessing the Mental Health of Adolescents: This brochure talks about depression, anxiety, etc. in adolescents, how to spot it and what to do about it.
  • Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents (AAMFT): Bipolar disorder is a serious mental health problem that affects between 1% and 5% of children and adolescents. Bipolar disorder is classified as a mood disorder by the mental health profession, and can include two types of mood disturbances: depression and mania (joyful, elevated or severely irritable moods). Bipolar disorders can affect all aspects of a child or adolescent's life, causing them difficulties at home, in school, and in getting along with friends and classmates.
  • Bullying (American Medical Association): This is a pdf file containing the proceedings from the AMA's Educational Forum on Adolescent Health and is entitled "Bullying"
  • The CDC's "Healthy Youth -- Mental Health": This site contains interesting information on the mental health of youth including issues such as alcohol and drug abuse prevention, suicide prevention, drug abuse, violence, etc.
  • Child and Adolescent Mental Health Fact Sheet from the National Youth Violence Prevention Resource Center: When young people's mental health problems go untreated, they can affect their development, school performance and relationships. The state of their mental health affects how they view themselves and others, how they evaluate and react to situations, and what choices they make and actions they take. Because mental health problems can affect a young person's judgment, in the rare case, emotional disturbances and mental disorders can be a risk factor for violence.
  • Eating Disorders (AAMFT): Eating disorders consume the individual in obsessive negative thinking and behaviors, and they consume the individual's relationships with family members, loved ones, and life. This pamphlet discusses the serious distress signals and what helps.
  • National Alliance on Mental Illness: Child & Adolescent Action Center: This site contains links to tips for parents, caregivers and youth on a host of different issues, research services and treatment, juvenile justice and child welfare, etc.
  • Rape Trauma (AAMFT): Whether it was 10 days ago or 10 years ago, emotions and thoughts may seem overwhelming following a sexual assault. In learning the facts about rape and how to get help, women will discover that the symptoms they experience, while confusing, are to be expected given the trauma of such an attack.
  • When Your Adolescent Acts Out Sexually (AAMFT): Curiosity surrounding sexuality is normal in the process of development. However, some adolescents' behavior exceeds the "norm" and extends sufficiently outside the realm of social mores as to draw the attention of state, clinical or legal entities. Offensive sexual behaviors range from sexual harassment (e.g., calling attention a person's body part.) to engaging in inappropriate and, at times, illegal sexual behaviors.